Archives for category: ECOLOGY

Enjoy this remarkable time lapse clip by Joel Schat. Just for the beauty of it 😉

Advertisements

The 89 m2 Insta House, designed by MAZIAR BEHROOZ ARCHITECTS, is available in the U.S. and comes with sliding windows, electrical fixtures and all wall, ceiling and floor finishes. The basic is US$99,800, including delivery and the upgraded Insta House is created from four recycled shipping containers (two on top of two) to create a high-ceiling, low cost home ready on site in 7 days! It is the winner of the AIA PECONIC DESIGN AWARD.
The Insta_House* recycles four 40′ by 8′ shipping containers (two on top of two) to create a comfortable, high-ceiling, low cost alternative to conventional construction. The units are retrofitted in a factory-setting. delivered to locations within the continental US and erected in a week.
Insta_House is the only pre-fab of its kind in the market: recycled material, high-ceiling, low-cost. It can provide multiple uses including art studio, living space, work-shop and relief housing.
Source: http://www.mbarchitecture.com/instahouse/


This Jules Verne fantasy is to be found in Fiji and contains 25 amazing suites. One enters from a lift. This along with a bar, gym, spa, meeting room, chapel, lounge and more…a lot more for a very hefty, 30,000$ for a week for 2! There are, naturally, home versions. Well, if you have to ask, it’s too $$$. See POSEIDON




OK, I know it’s been covered already but the sheer beauty of the concept and execution merits another posting. The mirror cube at the Treehotel in Harads, Sweden is a 4x4x4 of reflective glass with a pale plywood interior that is simple and cozy. With incredible views, it has a futuristic yet harmonious monolithic quality hovering amongst the trees…book at TREEHOTEL


An innovative approach to textile technology is unfolding with this technique that harnesses nature’s forces.
“BioCouture is a research project harnessing nature to propose a radical future fashion vision. We are investigating the use of microbial-cellulose, grown in a laboratory, to produce clothing. Our ultimate goal is to literally grow a dress in a vat of liquid…The material is nearest in feel to a vegetable leather and, like your vegetable peelings, it can be safely composted when you no longer want it.”

Suzanne Lee is Director of the project and a Senior Research Fellow at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. She is collaborating with scientists to unite design with cutting edge bio and nano-technologies.

BioCouture is investigating the use of microbes to grow a textile biomaterial. Certain bacteria will spin microfibrils of pure cellulose during fermentation which form a dense layer that can be harvested and dried. To a sugary green tea solution they add a mixed culture of bacterial cellulose, yeasts and other microorganisms to produce a flexible cellulose mat. The bacteria feed on the sugar and spin fine threads of cellulose. As these start to stick together they form a skin on the liquids surface. After two to three weeks, when it is approximately 1.5cm thick, they remove the cellulose skin from the growth bath. They can then either use it wet to mold onto a 3D form, like a dress shape, or dry it flat and then cut and sew it into a garment.
Lee is the author of ‘Fashioning The Future: tomorrow’s wardrobe’ published by Thames & Hudson.http://www.biocouture.co.uk/



In an incredible about face for a city like Milan, known for it’s fashion,endless shopping and terrible smog, the city has given the go-ahead for a vertical forest by architect, Stephano Boeri. So amazing is this construction that the Financial Times hails it as the most exciting building in the world. It’s about time.
The “Bosco Verticale” will cost 6 million Euros and will feature 900 trees and plants shielding luxury apartments. The resulting benefits are plenty: filtering pollution by absorbing CO2 and dust particles, improving the microclimate, reducing noise pollution to the building, saving energy by sheltering the building from solar heat in Summer and reducing rainwater run-off causing curb flooding. Let’s hope we see this become a norm! Why not have them simply as park spaces with a view?