Archives for posts with tag: future intelligence

Watch the future with augmented reality as realized by London designer, Keiichi Matsuda. Either it kills you or makes you stronger….

HYPER-REALITY from Keiichi Matsuda on Vimeo.

via Keiichi Matsuda’s Hyper-Reality film blurs real and virtual worlds

The Age Of The Long Near from The Future Laboratory on Vimeo.

London – This is The Age of the Long Near, in which we explore why short-term thinking is the greatest threat to business potential, our happiness as individuals and the world that sustains us.

The Future Laboratory’s creative team has produced a film for LS:N Global’s Spring/Summer 2015 Trend Briefing, which was held at South Bank on 12 March.

The video introduces The Optimised Self, our manifesto for the body and mind; Whole-system Thinking, consumerism that goes beyond sustainability and environmentalism; and The Immortal Brand, a new premise for businesses that want to thrive in The Age of the Long Near.

‘We wanted to establish the premise of The Age of the Long Near through a commanding spoken narrative,’ says Lynne Devine, who provided design and direction on the film. ‘The film traces the path of an orb as it evolves, regenerates and mutates before returning to a singularity, suggesting an infinite cycle of time with an element of the divine.’

For more information about the event, contact alena@thefuturelaboratory.com.

Animation: Mighty Elk http://mightyelk.co.uk/
Sound: Joe Ashworth https://soundcloud.com/joeashworth
Voice Over: Elizabeth Nestor http://www.damngoodvoices.com/

Images:
Van Gogh cycle path by Studio Roosegaarde, Neunen, Netherlands
Morphosis by Lucia Giacan for ODDA magazine
Prada Mens AW15 Catwalk by AMO. Photography by Alberto Moncada

At the expense of seeming a tech geek, these two fascinating developments in robotics allow a glimpse of the quickly accelerating future.

MIT continues its cheetah program but have advanced so far that the beast now can autonomously jump over obstacles at quite a speed with incredible stability. Must be seen to be believed.

On the opposite side of the spectrum we find nano-bots (again, from MIT) like the self-folding, maneuvering and ultimately, self destructing bot that could have many practical applications:

After launching the LG Display curved OLED televisions with 4K capability, this year’s offering is sure to make headlines. LG has a mind-melting 55-inch ‘wallpaper-style’ set that is a very thin 0.97mm and weighs only 4.1 pounds. As OLEDS don’t need backlighting,the actual components are not contained within the TV itself. The “mat” can be hooked up on a wall using a magnetic foundation, allowing the ever-present TV to practically disappear altogether.
No dates as to “when” this new development might hit first-adaptors..

New TVefe 

In light of the first successful telepathic experiments utilizing digital messages sent to remote volunteers, JWT has come out with its 10 key consumer trends and behavior for the next 10 years and beyond (one of which are telepathic technologies…) It demonstrates both an attraction and aversion to developing technologies and the omnipresent, connected and always on society.

JWT’s “10 Trends for 2014 and Beyond” is the result of quantitative, qualitative and desk research conducted by JWTIntelligence throughout the year and for this report. JWTIntelligence conducted quantitative surveys using SONAR™, JWT’s proprietary online tool. – See more at: http://www.jwt.com/blog/consumer_insights/10-trends-that-will-shape-our-world-in-2014-and-beyond/#sthash.WKd0NHxT.dpuf

1_ IMMERSIVE EXPERIENCES: Entertainment, narratives and brand experiences will become more immersive and altogether more enveloping in a bid to capture consumers’ imagination and attention.
2_ DO YOU SPEAK VISUAL?: We’re shifting to a visual vocabulary that relies on photos, emojis, video snippets and other imagery, largely supplanting the need for text. “Visual” is a new lingo that needs to be mastered.
3_ THE AGE OF IMPATIENCE: With the mainstreaming of the on-demand economy and our always-on culture, consumer expectations for speed and ease are rising exponentially. As businesses respond in kind, making the availability of their products and services more instant, impatience and impulsiveness will only continue to increase.
4_ MOBILE AS A GATEWAY TO OPPORTUNITY: In emerging markets, the mobile device is coming to represent a gateway to opportunity—helping people change their lives by giving them access to financial systems, new business tools, better health care, education and more.
5_ TELEPATHIC TECHNOLOGY: Thanks to the rise of brain-computer interfaces and emotion recognition technology, brands are getting more adept at understanding consumers’ minds and moods, and reacting accordingly in a very personalized way.
6_ THE END OF ANONYMITY: Thanks to an array of new technologies and a growing drive to collect personal data, it’s becoming nearly impossible to remain unobserved and untracked by corporations and governments. As anonymity becomes more elusive, expect pushback from consumers and a growing paranoia around technologies and services that affect privacy.
7_ RAGING AGAINST THE MACHINE: As we move further into the digital age, we’re starting to both fear and resent technology, fretting about what’s been lost in our embrace of unprecedented change. We’ll put a higher value on all things that feel essentially human and seriously question (while not entirely resisting) technology’s siren call.
8_ REMIXING TRADITION: With social norms quickly changing and a new anything-goes attitude, people are mashing up cherished traditions with decidedly new ideas, creating their own recipes for what feels right.
9_ PROUDLY IMPERFECT: Imperfection and even outright ugliness—the quirky, the messy and the clearly flawed—are taking on new appeal in a world that’s become all too polished or mass-produced. The imperfect is coming to feel more authentic, and also more comforting and meaningful.
10_ MINDFUL LIVING: Consumers are developing a quasi-Zen desire to experience everything in a more present, conscious way. Once the domain of the spiritual set, mindful living is filtering into the mainstream, with more people drawn to the idea of shutting out distractions and focusing on the moment. – See more at: http://www.jwt.com/blog/consumer_insights/10-trends-that-will-shape-our-world-in-2014-and-beyond/#sthash.WKd0NHxT.dpuf

Northwestern University in Chicago has announced results in electric brain treatment that may hold the key to rehabilitating memory disorders stemming from alzheimer’s, aging, brain injury, schizophrenia, stroke and just plain ole’ forgetfulness…Results showed substantial improvement of memory tests after the 3rd day of 20 minute cranial massages for 5 consecutive days using electric impulses to a sweetspot strongly connected to the hippocampus just under the skull. Cramming for exams just got a whole lot easier (lol).

Electric Current to Brain Boosts Memory from Northwestern News on Vimeo.

Stimulating a particular region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine® study published in the journal Science.

With a youthful appeal to 20-30 year olds, this colour will rejuvenate everything from home-wares like coffee makers to cars and naturally, clothing and accessories.

Radiant Orchid pantone 18-3224

Taking a rather novel approach to drones, this prototype for a new breed of tiny flying robots could hail a new chapter in stealth use that mimic the insect world. These “MAVs” (micro aerial vehicles) have been difficult to control and are weighed down but New York University has developed one that is featherweight and remains stable due to its petal propulsion which is a cross between a jellyfish and moth and is not much bigger than a dime! Would make a great art installation with a few dozen too….

Jelly fly

Stars came out to see the unveiling of the world’s first 3D printed dress (well, Deborah Harry anyhow…) Designed by Michael Schmidt of Lady Gaga/Cher fame (ok?) in collaboration with SHAPEWAYS, the resulting linked nylon was sprayed black, sprinkled with Swarovski and poured over the VERY beautiful Dita Von Teese. Oolala!
3D dress

With the race on for wearable technologies such as smartwatches by Apple and Samsung, Google is forging ahead with it’s glasses that incorporate augmented reality, straight out of William Gibson’s novel, “Virtual Light” from 1993.
Here you can have a sneak preview what this will look like…

Google Glass “Explorer” will retail for approx. US$1,500 and will go to market in 2014.

British Columbia-based Hyperstealth Biotechnology claims to be working on an extraordinary “invisibility cloak” that would render its wearer virtually invisible. Citing security concerns, the camouflage-design company has yet to provide anything beyond mock-ups of the Quantum Stealth cloak, but explained that the fabric works by bending light around a person, enabling them to disappear into the environment. While the technology may seem fantastic, the company insists that they have the backing of the U.S. Pentagon and the Canadian military. Watch for it.
http://www.hyperstealth.com/
quantum-stealth-invisible-military-camouflage-1-537x402

Like a scene out of Total Recall, the BCI (brain-computer interface) has been developed to the point where they can be found in novelty or spywear stores. Scientists have taken an off-shelf version and shown it has the capability of hacking the brain and pulling details straight from your mind.
University of Oxford, California Berkeley and Geneva gathered computer science students. They were briefed as being part of a security experiment but nothing else. A series of banks, maps, PIN # and such were displayed and by following P300 brain signals, the scientists were able to deduce where they lived and their banks by reducing the random data by up to 40%.
This coupled with information-prying technologies like smartphones, energy smart meters and naturally, Facebook , reveals an increasingly disturbing capability to monitor almost everyone and the relative simplicity of more sophisticated attacks with even pedestrian technology. Food for thought.


Graphs showing performance of the BCI test using three different data-response classification techniques with the dashed line displaying the correlation of random guesswork (Image: Martinovic et al.)

The mother of all forecasting discusses her latest insights which reveal some very interesting ideas such as:

*Everyday Spirituality: Not in a Buddhist mode, but to something that celebrates life on a small, day to day level.
*The loss of individual behavior: Collaborative efforts and groupings. Terrace style organization.
*The young father: The nurturer which gives new perspective on parenting.
*Fluidity: The creative elite is envisioning a borderless world, against what is happening nationally and politically, where each person incorporates another profession in their work. Something akin to a new renaissance (wo)man.
*New couples are like teammates,buddies, comrades, lovers.
*The rite of the blogger (future editor-in-chiefs?): By creating their own sphere of influence, sharing innate passions for their subjects and reinvigorating the written word.
Naturally, she says it all with casual conviction and succinct wording…

Google has sold interactive glasses for $1500 (only) during its annual software conference in San Francisco to first adaptors. If all goes well, a less expensive version of the glasses is expected to go on sale for consumers in early 2014. While wearing these glasses, directions to a destination or a text message from a friend may appear directly before your eyes. Conversing with friends in a video chat, take a photo without taking out a camera, phone or even buy a few things online as you walk around. JUST DON’T DRIVE DOING IT.

Isabelle Olsson, lead designer of Google’s Project Glass, talks about the design of the Google Glass during the keynote at Google’s annual developer conference


Scientists say they’re getting closer to Matrix-style instant learning
What price effortless learning? In a paper published in the latest issue of Science, neuroscientists say they’ve developed a novel method of learning, that can cause long-lasting improvement in tasks that demand a high level of visual performance.

And while the so-called neurofeedback method could one day be used to teach you kung fu, or to aid spinal-injury patients on the road to rehabilitation, evidence also suggests the technology could be used to target people without their knowledge, opening doors to numerous important ethical questions.
According to a press release from the National Science Foundation:

New research published today in the journal Science suggests it may be possible to use brain technology to learn to play a piano, reduce mental stress or hit a curve ball with little or no conscious effort. It’s the kind of thing seen in Hollywood’s “Matrix” franchise.

Experiments conducted at Boston University (BU) and ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories in Kyoto, Japan, recently demonstrated that through a person’s visual cortex, researchers could use decoded functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to induce brain activity patterns to match a previously known target state and thereby improve performance on visual tasks.

Think of a person watching a computer screen and having his or her brain patterns modified to match those of a high-performing athlete or modified to recuperate from an accident or disease. Though preliminary, researchers say such possibilities may exist in the future.

But here’s the bit that’s really interesting (and also pretty creepy): the researchers found that this novel learning approach worked even when test subjects weren’t aware of what they were learning:

“The most surprising thing in this study is that mere inductions of neural activation patterns…led to visual performance improvement…without presenting the feature or subjects’ awareness of what was to be learned,” said lead researcher Takeo Watanabe. He continues:

We found that subjects were not aware of what was to be learned while behavioral data obtained before and after the neurofeedback training showed that subjects’ visual performance improved specifically for the target orientation, which was used in the neurofeedback training.

Is this research mind-blowing and exciting? Absolutely. I mean come on — automated learning? Yes. Sign me up. But according to research co-author Mitsuo Kawato, the neurofeedback mechanism could just as soon be used for purposes of hypnosis or covert mind control. And that… I’m not so keen on.

“We have to be careful,” he explains, “so that this method is not used in an unethical way.” [Science via NSF]

By Jeff Salton.
The gestural interface used by Tom Cruise in the movie Minority Report was based on work by MIT Media Lab’s Hiroshi Ishii, who has already commercialized similar large-scale gestural interface systems. However, such systems comprise many expensive cameras or require the user to wear tracking devices on their fingers. To develop a similar yet cost effective gestural interface system that is within reach of many more people other researchers at MIT have instead been working to develop screens with embedded optical sensors to track the movement of the user’s fingers that could quickly make touch screens seem outdated.

“The goal with this is to be able to incorporate the gestural display into a thin LCD device” – like a mobile phone – “and to be able to do it without wearing gloves or anything like that,” says researcher Matthew Hirsch, a PhD candidate at the Media Lab says.

Hirsch, along with MIT Media Lab professors Ramesh Raskar and Henry Holtzman and visiting researcher Douglas Lanman, have instead been working on a project that uses embedded sensors to turn displays into giant lensless cameras that can recognize hand gestures.  MIT news reports that Paul Debevec, director of the Graphics Laboratory at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Technologies, whose doctoral thesis led to the innovative visual effects in the movie The Matrix says: “I like this one [gestural interface] because it’s really integrated into the display. Everyone needs to have a display anyway. And it is much better than just figuring out just where the fingertips are or a kind of motion-capture situation. It’s really a full three-dimensional image of the person’s hand that’s in front of the display.

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